It is my belief that Native American stories and biographies are breathtaking, at times badass examples of a people who had everything thrown at them, yet against all odds fought back to keep their way of life, culture, and traditions alive. This list includes the stories of those Natives I felt deserved recognition and remembrance, and when possible I will list their band as well as their tribe, for a more exact definition of where they came from.

Note, I've included Annie Oakley on this list because of her adoption into the Lakota Sioux Tribe; Jean Paul was included for the same reasons as she was adopted into the Tobique First Nation, and Olive Oatman for being adopted into the Mojave Tribe.

Entries:

  • Andra Rush of the Mohawk, Founder of Rush Trucking--one of the largest Native American Owned Businesses in the United States
  • Anfesia Shapsnikoff of the Aleut People, Leader and Educator
  • Bartolina Sisa of the Aymara, Rebel Leader
  • Bertha Parker Cody of the Seneca, The First Female Native American Archaeologist
  • Bessie Coleman, The First African American and Native American Woman to Earn a Pilot's License
  • Edmonia Lewis of the Chippewa, The First Professional African American and Native American Sculptor
  • Ella Cara Deloria of the Yankton Sioux, Ethnographer and Anthropologist
  • Florence Owens Thompson of the Cherokee, Subject of the Iconic "Migrant Mother" Photo
  • Gouyen of the Apache (either Mescalero or Chiricahua), Warrior with a Vendetta Against the Comanche
  • Gregoria Apaza of the Aymara, Rebel Leader
  • Captain Jack Kintpuash of the Modoc, Leader of His People During the Modoc War
  • Jean Paul, Adopted Into the Tobique First Nation (Maliseet), She was Married to the Man Who Eventually Became the Tribal Chief
  • John Killian Wren, The First FBI Agent to Have Native American Heritage
  • Juana Maria of the Nicoleño, The Lone Woman of San Nicholas Island
  • Kikisoblu of the Duwamish and Suquamish, Daughter of Chief Si'ahl
  • Lizette Charbonneau, Sacagawea's Daughter
  • Louise Siuwheem Polotkin of the Coeur d'Alene, Apostle To Her People
  • Lozen of the Chihenne Chiricahua Apache, Medicine Woman and Warrior Who Fought Alongside Victorio and Geronimo
  • La Malinche of the Nahua, Linguist Who Helped Bring Down the Aztecs
  • Mary Golda Ross of the Cherokee, First Female Native American Engineer
  • Matoaka of the Powhatan, Pocahontas
  • Moving Robe Woman of the Hunkpapa Sioux, Fought at the Battle of Little Bighorn
  • Naia, One of the Oldest Near-Complete Skeletons Ever Uncovered
  • Olive Oatman, White Child Captured and Then Adopted into the Mojave Tribe
  • Osh-Tisch of the Crow, Bade Warrior Who Fought at the Battle of the Rosebud
  • The Other Magpie of the Crow, Warrior Woman Who Fought at the Battle of the Rosebud
  • Rachel Eaton of the Cherokee, First Native American Woman from Oklahoma to Earn a PhD
  • Sacagawea of the Lemhi Shoshone, Guide, Interpreter, and The Lone Woman of the Corps of Discovery
  • Sarah Winnemucca of the Northern Paiute, Activist, Author, Lecturer, and Interpreter
  • Brigadier General Stand Watie of the Cherokee, General in the Confederate Army
  • Susan La Flesche Picotte of the Omaha, The First Native American Woman to Earn a Medical Degree
  • Te Ata Fisher of the Chickasaw, Storyteller who Brought Her People's History Around the World
  • Tituba, The Only Female Slave in Salem at the Outbreak of the Witch Trials
  • Toby Riddle of the Modoc, Interpreter During the Modoc War
  • Watanya Cicila of the Lakota Sioux, Annie Oakley's Adopted Tribal Name (Little Sure Shot)
  • Watkuese of the Nez Perce, The Woman Who Saved the Lives of the Corps of Discovery
  • Wilma Mankiller of the Cherokee, Former Principal Chief of Her People